[Infograpix] How To Shoot The Moon

Welcome to the supporting page for the How To Shoot The Moon infograpix.

If you don't have it already, feel free to download the card.

Terms of Use and Download

This Infograpix is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), meaning you can redistribute the Infograpix but you have to credit me and you cannot modify it or use it commercially.

The Infograpix can be downloaded for free. Download Full Size (jpg, 495kb)

The Infograpix

 Download the card via the link above, print it, cut it, fold it at the dashed line and glue together the two clean sides to have a card on the size of a credit card.   Note: This image is resized for web only: use the link above to download the infograpix in full size.

Download the card via the link above, print it, cut it, fold it at the dashed line and glue together the two clean sides to have a card on the size of a credit card. Note: This image is resized for web only: use the link above to download the infograpix in full size.

Legend

infographix-moon-legend.jpg

QR Code

infograpix-moon-QRicon.jpg

Scanning the QR code from the printed card or from the jpg file will bring you here to this post.

To scan the code I use the free QR Code Reader App, which is available for both iOS and Android devices.

 

Remarks

Some numbers are indicative and may be adapted to your need, like the focal length to use or the number of images to take.

Focal Length

To isolate the Moon and have some visible details, a focal length of 300mm on full frame camera is the bare minimum: longer focal length will make the Moon larger and more impressive, but with focal lengths longer than 600mm, the use of a tripod is a must to ensure sharp images.

 December 2017 Super Moon with at EFL 800mm.

December 2017 Super Moon with at EFL 800mm.

Exposure Settings

Shutter speed, ISO and aperture are based on the Looney 11 empirical rule, which works quite well as starting point, particularly on the full Moon.

You are encouraged to experiment with different settings, particularly with other Moon phases.

Number of Frames

You should take multiple photos, so to stack them later, to increase the amount of details and reduce image softness from atmospheric turbulences and sub-optimal seeing conditions.

An intervalometer will make this task very simple.

Focus

Use the Live View if possible, with the magnification focus aid.

On full Moon, because of the frontal light, the lunar surface is very flat and offer little help for focusing. Instead,  magnify the border and try to get it as defined and sharp as possible. You may also see some craters that have some contrast around the edge.

With other phases, magnify the area around the lunar terminator (the area where light and shadows meet on the lunar surface) and look to have the sharpest craters possible.

Further Readings

To know more in detail how I shoot the Moon, you can read this how-to article I have published on the Expert Photography website:

How To Photograph The Moon: From Urban Landscapes to the Lunar Surface

As a case study, I have written about editing Moon shots in this article on Expert Photography website:

Post-Processing Astrophotography: All You Need To Know